Thanksgiving Pumpkin Wreath

Deciding where to place the "Thankful" metal word on the glued on wooden leaf.

This is another great way to use the pumpkin wreath forms from the Dollar Tree. I bought every single one they had in late August. I’d had seen so many great ideas from the wonderful creatives on Pinterest, and everyone said they couldn’t find anymore. I was not taking that chance!

My sweet, sweet cousin gave me rolls of burlap that a friend of hers used in her wedding that they were just going to throw away. What, wait, no! This family does not like throwing away things that we might use, someday, somewhere. My husband hates it. He says he’s building me a she said, and he will definitely NOT let anyone burn it down. Thanks State Farm for that hilarious commercial!

I had yards of this lace and burlap fabric. Like many, many yards. This idea came to me yesterday, and I spent hours deciding exactly how I wanted it, then creating it. This piece is gorgeous and versatile. You can use it on your walls, on your door, on shelves, the list could go on and on.

But you came here for a tutorial so without further ado, here it is. You need:

  • pumpkin wire wreath form
  • 2.5″ orange wire ribbon (optional)
  • 5/8″ white satin ribbon
  • wood leaf shape- Dollar Tree sells a pack of 5 for $1
  • “Thankful” metal word- Dollar Tree has a pack of 3, also with “Welcome” and “Harvest.”
  • scissors
  • hot glue and glue gun
  • acrylic paint- chalk sage and orange spice
Picture of the needed supplies for this project. A wire pumpkin wreath form, 2.5" orange wire ribbon, 12"  wide burlap with lace covering, 5/8" ivory satin ribbon, scissors, hot glue and glue gun.

Start with your burlap. Mine was a foot wide. You will essentially be weaving it through the wires that run vertically. Feed it over the left outside wire, then under the second wire.

Demonstrates the way the 12" burlap runs over the first vertical pumpkin wire, and over the second.
The outer wire is covered by the burlap then over the second wire as above.

Now weave it over the third wire. Keep pulling the burlap through as you go. The next two wires (the two middle ones) should be seen from the front. So the burlap will go under both of them.Then feed the burlap over that fifth wire. Just as the second from the left had the burlap under it, you’ll do this for the second wire from the right. At the end, wrap the burlap over the right outer wire and around the back of the form. Use something like a clothespin to hold it for just a bit. I really didn’t need mine because the burlap is stiff, but it’s there just in case.

Shows the finished running of the burlap over and under the wire form. Also shows clothespins  holding the edges in place.

You will have a few inches short of finishing the bottom of the wreath, but we’ll address that later.

Next we’ll be wrapping your satin ribbon over the uncovered wires of the form. You can use any color you’d like, but I used ivory. Begin at the base of one of the exposed wires and wrap the ribbon around the back of the wire and hot glue it there. Then start wrapping, twirling, around the wire from the base to the top. Repeat this on every wire that is in the front of the burlap.

You now need to cover the bit of wire that will be exposed around the stem, where the burlap won’t rise enough to cover it. To the right side (or the left, doesn’t matter what side goes first) wrap your satin ribbon around the outer wire right next to the stem. Put a little glue on the wire to hold it in place. Wrap it a few times, then cut the ribbon and glue it down. Repeat this process on the left side of the stem.

Right where the stem attaches to the outer wire, you’ll need to make a tiny slit so that your burlap can cover on each side of the wires, on the inside of the stem and to the wire just outside of the wire. Do this to the other side as well. Now wrap a bit of the burlap around the wire to the back side while gluing it the frame. Glue the inside of the stem and to the right and left now. You can see how it looks when finished in the photo above. The picture I took of this process turned out really blurry. I’m so sorry!

Start gluing the top of the pumpkin first, right where you just glued the stem. On the right side of the stem, pull the burlap tightly around the wire to the back. Put a strip of hot glue on the back of the upper wire then push the fabric down. Continue until the top side of the right is attached. Repeat this process on the left of the stem, but don’t glue down the wires that are on the curved sides yet.

Depicts how to wrap and hot glue the satin ribbon around the entire stem

Place the wreath form face down to begin gluing down the inner wires. Start on the right side with the second wire from the outside, the first one covered with ribbon. Put a line of hot glue down the back of that wire, then press it down to firmly attach it. I went about 2″ at a time so the glue didn’t dry before I could push the fabric down. Continue until you’re about an inch and a half from the bottom which is where you’ll put more burlap to cover the bottom of the pumpkin.

Shows how to run a strip of hot glue down the back of the second wire from the outside of the wreath form. Squeeze the glue as you go, and push the fabric against the glue.

Pull your fabric taunt and run a strip of glue down the back of the first wire, wrapping the burlap around to the back of the wreath, securing it as you go. Again leave an inch to an inch and half unglued, just on the front first wire. Glue the entire burlap on the back side of the wreath.

Wrap the end of the burlap around the outside of the form, place hot glue on the wire while pressing it down as you go.

Turn the wreath face up, and begin gluing the wires that are covered with the burlap. Lift the burlap and squeeze some hot glue on the front side of the third wire. Press the fabric into the glue as you move down that wire. You may need to cut a tiny slit exactly where the wires meet on this wire and some of the others. It will allow you to wrap the burlap around all sides so that none of the wires can be seen.

Cut a slit a the juncture of the fabric where the vertical wire and the horizontal wires to allow the burlap to completely cover the form without it bunching up.

Continue on to the two middle wires covered with the ribbon, gluing and adhering. Move along all the way to the left outer wire.

Now glue the left side down completely.

Complete the gluing of the fabric around the outer top and edge of the form.

Let’s fix this uncovered section of the wreath. Drape some burlap across the section that’s open. Mark the back of the burlap section so that you can cut it to fit your wreath.

Run your next section just as you did with the first section of the fabric. Then glue just as you did the first section. You will need to cut slits where the wires are, just as above.

You’re finished with the majority of your wreath, phew!

You can use your “Thankful” metal word as it is, but I used chalk paint in a sage color. The same goes for your wood leaf. I painted mine with acrylic paint called orange spice. If you’re painting, go ahead and do that now so they can be drying while you finish up.

The stem of your pumpkin is looking kinda bare. Place a dot of glue on an end of your satin ribbon. Now wrap that ribbon up and around the stem until the metal wires are completely covered and glue that end down.

Create a bow for the stem of your pumpkin wreath. This is optional, but I like the look. If you’d like a tutorial on making one you can see this post. You can also see how to paint your leaf and metal word. Instead of using the same orange ribbon as the bow, I used the satin ribbon.

The leaves I bought from Dollar Tree have a small hole to hang them from. I made a tiny ivory sativ ribbon and glued in on top of the hole. Position your dried leaf in the middle of your wreath, then glue it on.

This picture shows how to place the hot glue on the wooden leaf and center it on the front of the completed wreath form.

You can choose whether you want a metal word on your wreath or choose to have a different one than my Thankful. It will still be beautiful. I glued mine on the center of the leaf. I love the look! Place a little hot glue along parts of the letters that will touch the leaf, just don’t add too much.

Shows the placing of the metal word centered on the middle of the leaf and form.

I am already wracking my brain for things to do with my other wreath forms. These are so great to decorate your entire home, or to make and bless your family or friends with!

Beautiful wreath displayed with other fall decor.

Please like and share this tutorial across social media. Share your ideas and projects in the comments. And as always thank you for your love and support!

If you liked this Thanksgiving decor, check out this fall wreath, this Halloween wreath, and these matching fall yarn wreaths. You can also check out these DIY doormats, for fall and for Thanksgiving.

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